Sunday, 13 September 2015

Season of mist and mellow fruitfulness ...



This post bathes, nay wallows, in self indulgence, so I do ask for forgiveness. I blame it all on losing my tripod camera plate, as for many months I have not been able to track it down, and so all my macro work has been hand held. Not good, as this has resulted in camera shake and poor photos. However, that is now resolved, as I have sourced a new one, and so today I was able to take advantage of the beautiful golden light on the plants, using my tripod once again. Once I started I just didn't seem to be able to stop ...


Above is Verbena Bonariensis against the light. This is the tall variety although I am also growing 'Lollipop' which is about half as tall, and a very useful plant, as it sits so well in the borders.

Eucomis Bicolour
I have grown Eucomis Bicolour for many years and have always wondered why it is so called. The photo above answers my question, and I don't know, now, how I missed those purple tips which contrast so well with the white ! Using a Macro lens really makes you look closely, and sometimes look anew.


I have found Eucomis Bicolour to be extremely hardy, and it weathered the freezing cold winter of 2009/10 outside in the garden, with no protection.


These two photos are of a Cardoon - a tall and stately bee magnet.



Above is Digitalis Illumination 'Raspberry', which has been blooming for months. I intend to dig it up  and overwinter it in the greenhouse, as one of its parents is the Canary island foxglove, which is tender. I left plants in the ground last winter, and, yes, of course, I lost them all !


Erm, it's a bulb, it's late flowering, it might be white ... and I haven't a clue what it is! Suggestions please ?


Above is a Fuchsia, overwintered in the conservatory, so, although it was late into flower, it is a large and healthy plant.


Is there a better blue anywhere ? Salvia Patens, grown from seed this year. They were easy to grow, but the germination rate was very poor at about 20%.


The scarlet Mandevilla, which has flowered constantly since spring, and been absolutely covered in sweet blooms. It is tender, but overwintered well in the frost-free conservatory, and still had blooms on it at Christmas.


The rose-without-a-name because I lost the label ! Again, suggestions are most welcome.


Rudbeckia, the stalwart of the season. Reliable, stands proud without the need for staking, flowers for weeks ... what's not to like ...

Clematis seed head


This dahlia is ancient and has never been lifted, just grown larger and larger over the years, and , ridiculously, I think it has got darker! I really can't remember those nearly black flower centres before, but they contrast very well with the purple petals.

Clematis 'Polish Spirit'


Many of the roses are blooming as strongly as they did in June, and this 'Wisley' is no exception.

Helenium
Like the harbinger of doom I am, I have included this last shot, as a reminder to enjoy every minute of the remaining weeks in the garden, as pretty soon, it will all look like this ...























36 comments:

  1. Great shots Jane.
    I am finding that some Verbena 'Lollipop' seedlings are coming up at full V. bonariensis height. I'm having to shift them around the borders now, accordingly! And yes, I lost all my Digitalis Illumination last year too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jessica, lucky you having happy V Bon. which self seeds. Ours stays with us stoically for a season then usually die off in winter leaving no offspring. As for D Illumination, it was not made clear on the plant label that it is borderline hardy and would benefit from lifting. As they are expensive plants, I am determined not to lose any more...

      Delete
  2. We are all the benefactors of your new tripod. I am much too impatient to fully use mine, but you have inspired me to try harder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ricki, you are too kind, thank you. I have been so disappointed by hand held shots as the sharpness has just not been there. As depth of Field is so limited anyway, using Macro, sharp images are a perennial problem, if you will excuse the pun!

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Hi Mark and Gaz and thanks! Such a pleasure to get out there taking them.

      Delete
  4. Wonderful colour still in the garden & beautiful photographs Jane. Which macro lens do you use?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Brian, it is not a dedicated Macro lens Brian, I will have a look and tell you exactly what it is. Back in the day I used to use extension tubes for close work - but then I had a dark room and chemicals and a safe light too ! What good fun it was !

      Delete
  5. Lovely photos and even lovelier subjects!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I really love taking macro photographs as you say you see the world in a completely different way. Bees absolutely adore cardoon flowers don't they?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue, those bees were stacked above that cardoon like planes at Heathrow!

      Delete
  7. Jane what is your zone ? I am in 5b and would have some of these tender plants but yours are doing so well it is amazing !
    I have yet to try my tripod .. it is on my to do list, now that I have a new lens and polarizing filter it is much easier to take pictures in the bright afternoon light. But alas ... Fall is coming, not that I mind .. it has been a hell month for August and a lot of my plants have suffered from it ... time to cool down and rest over winter ... that is after I try to get most of my chore list done ? haha
    Great photos girl !
    Take care
    Joy : )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Joy, nice to hear from you! Using the tripod made such a difference to the quality of my photos, I was so pleased to be able to use it again.. What is your new lens? I am unsure of my zone, but will check it out and let you know.

      Delete
  8. Well hurrah for a new tripod, and thank you for indulging yourself and us! I was glad to read that you had germination rate issues with that salvia, I thought it was just me. And thank you for saying that you didn't get the "Illumination" foxgloves to overwinter, apparently we may be in for a harsh one this year thanks to el nino, so not a plant I will indulge in just yet... And I really must take cuttings of various things...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Janet and thanks for comments. Even with a low germination rate I think the salvias were worth growing, as it has still ended up as a cheap way to get salvia plants. I keep vowing to myself that this year I will lift every single dahlia, melianthus and digitalis 'Illumination'...

      Delete
  9. So many great blooms & fun photos! My garden, unfortunately, has very little interest this month.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jennifer and thanks for your comments. Autumn is encroaching now and the garden is wanting to snuggle down and rest for awhile! Interest will inevitably decline over the next few weeks, sadly!

      Delete
  10. What exotic looking flowers you have -- that emerging clematis head is amazing, probably a mathematical formula in spiraling or something. I'm glad you have your proper tools back -- they make a job so much easier, don't they? Thanks for sharing your new photos! -Beth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Beth and thanks for your comments. Yes, the proper tools certainly make the job easier !

      Delete
  11. You have a beautiful garden!

    Thanks for sharing this post and giving me the idea to also participate!

    I just started a new blog last week about gardening and crafting. You are always welcome visit if you want.

    Greetings, Sofie
    http://sofies-succulent-beads.blogspot.be/2015/09/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-september-2015.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sofie, I will pop across and pay you a visit! Good luck with your new blog!

      Delete
  12. You have a beautiful garden!

    Thanks for sharing this post and giving me the idea to also participate!

    I just started a new blog last week about gardening and crafting. You are always welcome visit if you want.

    Greetings, Sofie
    http://sofies-succulent-beads.blogspot.be/2015/09/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-september-2015.html

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love these pics!! Just beautiful. :o) I think your mystery plant is a fall blooming allium.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Tammy - it could be an Allium ! I will know soon, hopefully, as it will be in full bloom.

      Delete
  14. Beautiful photos. I do like to see things close up, you get to see every minute detail.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jo, so true, you really do look at things in a different way when you see them close up.

      Delete
  15. I do like your close-up shots Jane, they are very effective. I couldn't agree more about the cardoon it is a beautiful plant and as you say a great attractor of insects. As for the mystery bulb, I can take a wild guess that it is Ornithogalum thyrsoides (Chinkerinchee) but I would not like to put money on it :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you kindly Rick ... I think you have solved the conundrum of the mystery plant! I did plant an Ornithogalum about 18 months ago, but as nothing happened last year, I completely forgot about it ! Bet it has finally decided to put in an appearance !

      Delete
  16. Aaahhhh! Such loveliness.... thank goodness for tripods and accessories that inspire one to get out and click a few mindblowingly beautiful pictures. I feel like I've been to a very sumptuous banquet! Thank you, Jane.
    If you don't mind my asking, which macro lens do you use? I've been searching for one myself and have been dilly-dallying for far too long over it.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks Sunita. Thank you for your kind comments.
    The lens I use for Macro work is a Sigma 70 - 300 f4 - 5.6 , used with my Canon EOS. It is considerably less expensive than many Macro lenses but I have been pleased with its performance. I have just looked up the reviews on Amazon, and it gets 4.5 out of 5.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Nice that you made the effort to indulge us too Jane. Some wonderful macro shots you've produced. I love my Cardoons almost as much as the bees do.
    You've still got plenty going on in your garden......enjoy it while it lasts, I agree!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Angie, I am savouring every last little ray of sun at the moment. This weekend has been excellent - sunny and warm, and I have managed to get heaps done. Very satisfying!

      Delete
  19. Really stunning photos of many wonderful flowers. Your ancient dahlia is such a dark beauty and I love that macro picture of the Eucomis bicolor. I had it also a long time unprotected in the garden, but 2 years ago it had definitely gone.
    Happy gardening in autumn, it´s nice outside.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for visiting and reading.
I really welcome comments and have learned much from them, over the years of leaning over the virtual garden gate ...