Sunday, 7 September 2014

Fig-uratively speaking



Ah, 'tis the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, and now we can gather in the harvest, after our labours. Mind you, I won't be giving up the day job quite yet - as we only got one solitary, single fig !  Needless to say, once it ripened, it was delicious, and we fought over it, before dividing it in half and scoffing it with our muesli for breakfast!





I can't say I am surprised at the paucity of the harvest though, after what that poor little fig tree has had to endure - it has been brutally pruned (guilty? moi?), suffered as builders re-roofed behind it, and then had the indignity of being pruned AGAIN so the builders could get to the hard-to-reach places !



Despite this, the fig tree has survived, and recovered to the extent that the butchery is not apparent as the leaves have covered everything. It is still growing strongly, and not showing any signs of slowing down.


The clematis was cut back at the same time as the fig tree but, as you can see below, it has not made such a speedy recovery. It is showing regrowth, but we will have to wait until next year until we see any flowers.




We should be ok next year as there are lots of little figlets waiting in the wings, so, barring all lopper- based accidents, they should find their way into our muesli!




There has been a catastrophe quite close to the fig tree, but not near enough to harm it. The ten foot tall stone boundary wall suffered a partial collapse thanks to the power of the tail end of Hurricane Bertha. Our neighbours acquired a surprise rockery on their lawn, overnight.


The apex of the gable wall has fallen, as has a lot more stonework on the other side. It doesn't look half as bad from our side ... poor neighbours next door! So, the builders will be back to build it up again, but this time, the fig can be left alone, as it on the other side of the left hand wall.

So, on the whole, August has been a good month for my little fig tree, and it risen above previous adversity, and even produced a little fig !

Below is a photo from April, so you can really see the progress it has made ...




Thanks again to Lucy at 'Loose and leafy' for hosting this tree following meme. Do check out the huge variety of trees featured at Looseandleafy.blogspot.co.uk


40 comments:

  1. Your fig has done really well, you can't tell at all that it has been through trying times. Keep an eye on those tasty figs as they ripen. We found that in our garden we have another competitor for its fruits....squirrels!

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    1. Who would have thought squirrels would have a taste for the slightly exotic ! I shall keep a vigilant watch !!

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  2. The fig looks really healthy, great tree

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    1. Hi Papaver, thank you, it does now! It has been through some nail biting adventures so far this season!

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  3. Your fig tree looks realy nice, they have a nice leaf and fruit....
    Amanda

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    1. Hi Amanda, it is a lovely tree despite the ill treatment it has received at my hands !

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  4. Did you find it wept badly when you pruned it. We haven't dared try again with ours as it oozed liquid seemingly for days when we pruned ours.

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  5. Hi Helen, well well well - ours never shed a tear! Not one !

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  6. Your fig tree is looking so well, almost as if it hadn't been through such a traumatic time! I hope you enjoy your figs next year.

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    1. I think the trauma is becoming a distant memory for it now ! Let's hope the winter is not too harsh ...

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  7. I remember when you cut the fig tree back....What a difference! It looks wonderful. Even if it didn't produce fruit, the leaves are so showy. I'm not sure I understand.....are you saying the little figs are going to stay all winter and ripen next September?

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  8. It certainly looks a lot healthier now !
    On Gardener's world, Monty Don was saying that the larger ones would ripen in the new year, in a more favourable climate, and the smaller ones will ripen next summer. I think ! I'm sure others will be more knowledgeable than me about little figlets!!

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  9. It is amazing how well the fig tree recovered and even managed to produce a fig. I am sure the clematis won't be far behind.

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    1. Hi Jennifer, it must be pretty well indestructible! I hope the clematis makes a good come back next season!

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  10. Wonderful job, Jane! Lovely figs and I am sure you will have some juicy sweet figs later. I hope the repair of the stone wall will not affect the fig tree much.

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  11. I so wish I had thought of that title - excellent! But I don't have any fig trees, so I'm not sure how I would have used it. In any case, I wish you a bountiful harvest of figs next year!

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  12. It is a groan-worthy title !! Thankyou!

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  13. Hi Jane, thank you for visiting my blog and for understanding the sadness of fall's impending destruction. You and your blog are a real delight. I'm adding you to my Feedly list. I enjoyed looking at your "About Me" page and seeing your fabulous gardens. So much to enjoy. I too have a fig tree but I almost lost it after last winter's extreme lows. I don't have figs on it but I sure love the foliage. I hope your repairs were taken care of. That red fuzzy caterpillar is called the Chenille Plant (Acalypha hispida). It is tender here but apparently invasive in frost free areas. This is the first year I've grown it and it's kind of fun. Cheers.

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    1. Hi Grace, nice to meet you and thank you for your kind comments.Maybe your fig will rally after it's near demise ? I know mine did! Thanks for identifying red furry caterpillars !

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  14. Your tree has recovered really well and looks really healthy. How exciting to get a fig. Next year you will have lots with a bit of luck.

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  15. Hi Chloris, yes, I 'suppose I was lucky to get even ONE fig after the trials I have put that poor tree through!

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  16. Three cheers for the resilience of your fig tree, and fingers crossed that next year you will both be able to breakfast on whole figs, no fights or halving required! It really is an impressive recovery. As for the wall collapse, I must admit I had been a little envious of your lovely stone outbuildings. No more! I hope it hasn't strained the relationship with your neighbour, and that the builders don't mysteriously discover that there is less stone than required for repairs. So many useful things to be done with stone...

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    1. Hi Janet, one fig each would be a vast improvement!
      The neighbours are lovely, thank goodness, and very understanding about their new rockery, but, after what you hinted at ... I shall be numbering those stones !!

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  17. I'm sure your fig was delicious, we're just harvesting the second crop from ours. Having a tree that crops twice a year in wonderful! The first crop was in late June this year (usually July) but were large and a bit watery but the second crop also a bit early are perfect - you can't have too many figs can you?

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  18. Hi, two crops a year is positively exotic! Do you ever get all figged out ?

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  19. I'm so glad you got a fig. There is something timeless about a fig tree and a brick wall. Figs live a long time don't they?

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  20. Hi Susan, I think they are very long-lived , but this is my first one. It is still a youngster at about 15 years old.

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  21. I'm kind of jealous. I love figs and I really wish it was possible to grow fig trees where I live.

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  22. Oh dear! Whereabouts are you Erika ?

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  23. At least you got one fig to enjoy, and the plant does look incredibly healthy so hopefully the promise of more to come next year. You can't beat a fresh fig :-) . What a shame about your wall, but lucky the builders don't need to put their size nines near any plants this time around. Let's hope there is no more adverse weather this year.

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  24. Hi paula, let's hope it is all plain sailing from here on in! A mild autumn and winter would also be much appreciated !

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  25. Your fig tree looks quite healthy now, and hopefully next year there will be enough you won't have to share one fig! Like Erika, I am jealous--fig trees aren't hardy in my area.

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  26. Hi Rose, thanks for your comments . Yes, hopefully there will be at least 2 figs next year !!
    Whereabouts are you ? My fig tree has coped with minus fifteen ok !

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  27. Your fig tree looks quite lush considering all it's been through, Jane. I am really quite envious of your one fig, as we can't grow them here, and they are expensive to buy. I think next year will be a bumper year for you and your fig tree. P. x

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  28. Hi Pam, thanks for your comments. I hope you are right and that there is more than one fig next year! Does it get too cold in the winter for you to grow a fig tree ?

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  29. I wanted a fig tree for a long time. Your story pushes me from wanting to actually getting it! Love your sense of humor!

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  30. Hi Tatyana, thanks for comments 1 Go for it ... you won't regret it ! Hope you get more figs than me !

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  31. I'm glad your fig survived. I've read they're tough trees. As for the present from Bertha, she has mighty poor taste! Too bad she didn't blow in a pile of money to have the wall fixed. If you'd like some blue mist flower seeds, send me your address at gardenatcasamariposa@gmail.com and I'll send some over. :o)

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  32. Too kind Tammy! That would be lovely - and I shall send you something interesting in return ! Are you into grasses ? Some lovely Molinia seeds or maybe some from Rosa Glauca - or something smaller and more floriferous ?

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